Detail

Title ID 4349Collection ID367
TitleA Bus for All People
Date25 January 2001
Genre/TypeAmateurCine/Video clubNon-fictionActuality/Factual
ThemeTransport Public Services
KeywordsCommunities Motor Vehicles Old Age Outings Rural Areas Transport
Location
LocalHassocks Hurstpierpoint Fulking Poynings Pyecombe
RegionalWest Sussex
NationalEngland United Kingdom
Credits
ProductionMid-Sussex Camcorder & Cine Society
DistributorA 3 minute 30 seconds version was screened by Meridian television in August, 2002. FreeScreen
EditorTony Chard
FormatColour Sound
Duration00:04:49:10
Copyright & AccessCopyright restrictions apply, contact Screen Archive South East for details

Summary

A film, made by the Mid-Sussex Camcorder & Cine Society, describing the Hurst and Hassocks Community Bus service. The service provides transport for the elderly and disabled and other community members around Mid Sussex.

Description

The film, accompanied by music and commentary, describes how the "Hurst & Hassocks Community Bus" service was introduced in 1993 and is run by volunteer drivers with the support of county and local authorities. The regular minibus service is described as being "More than just a means of transport; the community bus has become a way of life". Elderly people are shown taking the bus to the library at Hassocks. Volunteers are shown cleaning and maintaining the bus and the wheelchair access is emphasised. One day a week the bus runs via the Sussex villages of Poynings, Fulking, Albourne and Sayers Common. For villages without a shop or post office, the community bus is described as "something of a lifeline". There are scenes of elderly people getting on the bus, views of the bus on the road and views of the road and countryside from the bus. People are described as using the bus for visits to banks, the post office and the shops, but also as "a social occasion" in itself. The bus has stop-off points in Hurstpierpoint and Hassocks and terminates at the "Age Concern" centre. There, elderly people are shown having a cup of tea. But the service is not just for the elderly or the infirm, but for "everybody in the community". To illustrate this, a mother and her two young children are shown boarding the bus.

The film was submitted to the annual Albany film Competition, and an edited version of the film was broadcast by Meridian television in 2002.